Pacific Northwest Doodles

Featuring sketchbook doodles, phone photography, food experiments and crafts.
official-mens-frights-activist:

anarcho-queer:

U.S. Dismisses Lawsuit Against Chiquita For Hiring Paramilitary Groups To Kill Colombians
July 25th, 2014
A US appeals court has dismissed a lawsuit against banana grower Chiquita brought by at least 4,000 Colombians who accused the company of supporting paramilitary forces who killed or tortured their relatives.
In the 2-1 decision on Thursday, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals found a 2013 US Supreme Court ruling limited foreign nationals’ ability to seek damages against corporations in US courts.
Chiquita, the world’s largest banana producer, pleaded guilty in 2007 to making over 100 payments beginning in 1997 to the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), a right-wing paramilitary group the United States considered a terror organization. Chiquita handed AUC $1.7 million in cash and checks before ending the practice in February 2004.
In 2001, Chiquita was identified in invoices and other documents as the recipient of a shipment from Nicaragua of 3,000 AK-47 assault rifles and 5 million rounds of ammunition. The shipment was actually intended for the AUC.
Banana giant Chiquita has spent around $780,000 in the past year and a half to block a 9/11 victims’ bill in the US Congress. The legislation aims to aid victims and families in their claims against supporters or sponsors of terror attacks.
 The bill would attempt to impose civil liabilities on those found to have aided and abetted US-designated terrorist groups overseas. 
Now-Attorney General Eric Holder represented the fruit company in the previous lawsuit.

Breaking news: wealthy US corporation does horrible thing, US government lets them get away with it. More at 6.

official-mens-frights-activist:

anarcho-queer:

U.S. Dismisses Lawsuit Against Chiquita For Hiring Paramilitary Groups To Kill Colombians

July 25th, 2014

A US appeals court has dismissed a lawsuit against banana grower Chiquita brought by at least 4,000 Colombians who accused the company of supporting paramilitary forces who killed or tortured their relatives.

In the 2-1 decision on Thursday, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals found a 2013 US Supreme Court ruling limited foreign nationals’ ability to seek damages against corporations in US courts.

Chiquita, the world’s largest banana producer, pleaded guilty in 2007 to making over 100 payments beginning in 1997 to the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), a right-wing paramilitary group the United States considered a terror organization. Chiquita handed AUC $1.7 million in cash and checks before ending the practice in February 2004.

In 2001, Chiquita was identified in invoices and other documents as the recipient of a shipment from Nicaragua of 3,000 AK-47 assault rifles and 5 million rounds of ammunition. The shipment was actually intended for the AUC.

Banana giant Chiquita has spent around $780,000 in the past year and a half to block a 9/11 victims’ bill in the US Congress. The legislation aims to aid victims and families in their claims against supporters or sponsors of terror attacks.

The bill would attempt to impose civil liabilities on those found to have aided and abetted US-designated terrorist groups overseas.

Now-Attorney General Eric Holder represented the fruit company in the previous lawsuit.

Breaking news: wealthy US corporation does horrible thing, US government lets them get away with it. More at 6.

(via cronbach)

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Lucky Beans

Like so many people during the Great Depression of the 1930s, Marshall Loman’s dad has lost his job. There’s little money, but there are plenty of beans-in fact, Ma cooks them for supper every single night! Beans start looking better when Marshall sees the contest posted in the furniture store window. HOW MANY BEANS ARE IN THE JAR? WIN THIS BRAND NEW SEWING MACHINE! Ma needs that sewing machine-but how can Loman possibly guess right? Then Marshall remembers something he learned in arithmetic class. Becky Birtha’s engaging story, based on her grandmother’s memories of Depression years in the African American community, is illustrated by Nicole Tadgell’s expressive paintings.

Becky Birtha…

has written two picture books for children–two historical, culturally rich, family-inspired picture books that would be valuable additions to any classroom or personal library…read more at The Brown Bookshelf

a Letter for Sang-Ah

peaceshannon:

this child was sent for adoption without her mother’s consent (like my sister and me). her mom has been searching for her for years with no success.

lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day

Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.

Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.

The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.

Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org, via scientificillustration)

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom

This beautifully written book tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history—including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom.

Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her—her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children—but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots’s widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century.

The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story

At the turn of the nineteenth century, James Vann, a Cherokee chief and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill in Georgia, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. In this first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the plantation, Tiya Miles tells the story of Diamond Hill’s founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s.

This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries—from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book includes rich portraits of the women of these various communities. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier

Tiya Miles…

is a professor at the University of Michigan in the Department of American Culture, Department of Afro-American and African Studies, Department of History, Department of Women Studies, and Native American Studies Program. Her research and creative interests include African American and Native American interrelated and comparative histories (especially 19th century); Black, Native, and U.S. women’s histories; and African American and Native American women’s literature…continue reading

(via cronbach)

copperkiwi:

ninjaeyecandy:

4gifs:

Bully messes with karate champ. [video]

The source video is very, very worth watching. A few things to point out:
The young woman in the dark coat is continually trying to escape from the man. She has spoken to him, she’s pulled away, she’s even tried to walk away before he dragged her back. She hit him as a last resort but it didn’t do anything, he just got more aggressive.
The girl in the white jacket was walking by, recognized that a bad situation was happening, stopped, and intervened. At 0:28 she calls the man out, and continues to call him out until he breaks off attacking the young woman in the dark coat and turns his aggression on her. At which point she defends herself—and then she escorts the young woman in the dark coat safely away.
This is a hero.

Bringing this back.

copperkiwi:

ninjaeyecandy:

4gifs:

Bully messes with karate champ. [video]

The source video is very, very worth watching. A few things to point out:

The young woman in the dark coat is continually trying to escape from the man. She has spoken to him, she’s pulled away, she’s even tried to walk away before he dragged her back. She hit him as a last resort but it didn’t do anything, he just got more aggressive.

The girl in the white jacket was walking by, recognized that a bad situation was happening, stopped, and intervened. At 0:28 she calls the man out, and continues to call him out until he breaks off attacking the young woman in the dark coat and turns his aggression on her. At which point she defends herself—and then she escorts the young woman in the dark coat safely away.

This is a hero.

Bringing this back.

(Source: 4gifs, via iamuhura)

A post for men about creepy men

realsocialskills:

I wrote a post a while back about how some people are very good at getting away with doing intentionally creepy things by passing themselves off as just ~awkward~.

Recently, I noticed a particular pattern that plays out. While creeps can be any gender, there’s a…

batwiing:

That Black Excellence they don’t want us to know about… Please repost this

batwiing:

That Black Excellence they don’t want us to know about… Please repost this

(via plant-moon)

tehnakki:

jon-snow:

god bless sdcc

This panel was so good and much better received than last year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel was. Natalie Dormer had some FANTASTIC speeches. I’ll try to find a transcript /video

(via iamuhura)

One of the biggest problems for service industry workers is that many forms of direct action, such as Slowdowns, end up hurting the consumer (mostly fellow workers) more than the boss. One way around this is to provide a better or cheaper service - at the boss’ expense, of course.

In 1968, bus and train workers in Lisbon, Spain, gave free rides to all passengers to protest the denial of wage increases. Conductors and drivers arrived for work as usual, but the conductors did not pick up their money satchels. Needless to say, public support was solidly behind these take-no-fare strikers.
In New York City, USA, IWW restaurant workers, after losing a strike, won some of their demands by taking the advice of IWW organisers to “pile up the plates, give ‘em double helpings, and figure checks on the low side.”

—How to Fire Your Boss, from the IWW (via sedimentarysyndicalist)

(Source: kinkshamingdesade, via blood-and-vitriol)

Historic photos on Percival Landing